Breed Info

Ragdoll History

In the early ’60s a woman in Riverside, California, by the name of Ann Baker created the RAGDOLL by breeding what was believed to be a white female Persian-type cat to a Seal Point Birman. One of the male offspring from this breeding was then bred to a female Burmese. This was the foundation for the Ragdoll.

The above paragraph states what most Ragdoll breeders believed were the beginnings of the Ragdoll for many years. However, more recent investigations lead us to believe that the Ragdoll’s beginnings were somewhat different. The following is taken from the book The Definitive Guide To Ragdolls by Lorna Wallace, Robin Pickering and David Pollard, published by Ragdoll World UK.

At the time Ann had been borrowing one of Josephine’s older sons to sire progeny in her Black Persian breeding programme. This son had the appearance of a Black/Brown Persian and she named him Blackie, and it was one of her visits to borrow him that she saw Blackie’s brother. He appeared most impressive and in Ann’s words had the appearance of a Sacred Cat of Burma, (The Birman Breed). Having already established the owner’s trust, she was also permitted to borrow this cat to mate with her own females. She was most taken with this son of Josephine and named him Raggedy Ann Daddy Warbucks.

What Ann clearly states is that Blackie and Daddy Warbucks are both sons of Josephine, but with different sires. In the IRCA booklet it would appear to indicate that Blackie’s father was a black cat from the East, that appeared more Persian than Burmese. During detailed questioning, Ann confirmed that no-one had ever seen the father of Daddy Warbucks, and he was the only kitten in that particular litter of Josephine’s. This being so, makes it difficult to take the origins of the breed further.

The RAGDOLL was first recognized as a pure breed in 1965 by NCFA (now defunct). Following that achievement Ann did nothing to further the Ragdoll in the fancy. Fortunately, a new breeder husband and wife team bought a pair from Ann and realized the breed had to be shown and accepted by the various associations in the fancy. RAGDOLLS are accepted today in all associations. However, some Associations do not allow Ragdolls in certain patterns to compete.

The beauty of the RAGDOLL is only one of their many features. Their disposition and personality are what makes them a truly unique cat. They are quiet, playful, placid, relaxed and very loving. They make a wonderful house or apartment cat. Because they possess a non-fighting instinct, a RAGDOLL should never be left outside unattended.  RAGDOLLS are docile, large and affectionate and respond well to children and other pets. RAGDOLLS are slow to mature physically obtaining full maturity between 3 and 4 years of age. Altered adult males may reach 15 to 20 pounds, females will weigh about 5 pounds less. The RAGDOLL’s fur is rabbit-like, medium long with little shedding. The RAGDOLL requires little or no routine grooming. All RAGDOLLS have beautiful blue eyes.

– Source: RFCI.org

Miniature Goldendoodles

Description
The Goldendoodle’s ancestry along both parent lines is as hunters and water dogs. The physical appearance of the Goldendoodle runs anywhere from a shaggy-looking retriever to a curl-relaxed poodle, but usually it falls somewhere in the middle. The color of the coat can be cream, gold, apricot, chocolate and black. Like many poodle crosses, most Goldendoodles don’t shed, or shed lightly, and could be hypo-allergenic.

Temperament
Goldendoodles are an intelligent and obedient family companion. They are everybody’s friend and devoted to their family. They are friendly towards children, other dogs and pets, and easy with strangers. They are social dogs, happiest when with people. Their intelligence, eagerness to please, and love of learning make them very easy to train. They are medium-sized family dogs with easy dispositions.

Height, Weight
Being that my sire, Spencer, is a 20# Miniature Poodle, my puppies should grow to be a medium sized dog.

Approximate Height

  • Males: 19 inches
  • Females: 18 inches

Approximate Weight

  • Males: 35 pounds
  • Females: 30 pounds

Health Problems
As a hybrid cross they grow healthier and live longer than either parent line. The only genetic diseases they can be prone to would be those shared by both the Golden Retriever and the Miniature Poodle. We have never had a case of hip dysplasia with any of my puppies, and my dogs have passed the CERF and BAER tests on their eyes and ears. My puppies are guaranteed for two years to be free from any hereditary problems.

Living Conditions
Goldendoodles require a moderate amount of exercise and their coats are generally low maintenance. They can live in the city or on a farm. They are social dogs and they are happiest when they are with people.

Exercise
Goldendoodles require a moderate amount of daily exercise. The Retriever in them allows them to enjoy games that involve retrieving.

Life Expectancy
About 15 years

Grooming
As a hybrid cross, Goldendoodles will inherit fur that looks retriever-like, or poodle-like, but usually something in-between. Like many poodle crosses, many Goldendoodles don’t shed, or shed lightly, and could be hypo-allergenic. They generally require little grooming.

Origin
The Goldendoodle is a Golden Retriever and Poodle cross. The Goldendoodle gets its name from it’s mixed heritage – Golden Retriever and Poodle. Goldendoodles are a hybrid dog, a first generation cross, and as such they exhibit “hybrid vigor”. This is a phenomenon in animal breeding referring to the fact that the first cross between two unrelated purebred lines is healthier and grows better than either parent line. The puppies take on the best traits of both breeds. The hybrid cross between these two parent breeds are terrific family dogs, friendly, intelligent, affectionate and easy to train. As more and more people live in the city, needs have changed. Many are not looking for dogs that can hunt, but are looking for companions. The need for dogs who are playful, friendly towards people and pets, easy to train and easy to maintain has spurred breeders to cross breed two of the most intelligent and popular breeds of our time.

Group

  • Hunting Dogs
  • Flushing Dogs

Recognition
American Canine Hybrid

Havanese

Description
If never primped, clipped or altered in any way, the Havanese gives a rugged impression in a little dog. The legs are strong and allow for free and easy movement. The dark eyes and long tail are covered with long silky hair. The profuse coat varies from wavy to curly. The Havanese is a double-coated breed with soft hair, both on outer and undercoat. Adult coat reaches 6 to 8 inches, and has a pearly sheen. Some Havanese carry a short haired recessive gene. If two Adults with this recessive gene have a litter of puppies, it is possible that some of the puppies will be born with smooth coats. A Havanese with a short coat cannot be shown and is a serious fault in the show arena. Some have nicknamed the Havanese born with short coats Shavanese. Eye rims, the nose and lips are solid black on all colors except the true chocolate dog. The Havanese comes in any color, including cream, gold, white, silver, blue, and black. Also parti and tricolors. In North America, all colors are recognized, no preference is given to one color over another. Black and chocolate are preferred colors with many North American breeders. A chocolate Havanese must retain at least a 1 inch (2.6 cm.) patch of chocolate hair. Chocolates also have green or amber eyes. In some European Countries the black and chocolate dogs, were not always recognized. But the black dogs have been recognized for several years, and the Chocolate dogs are now recently recognized. The gait is unique, lively & ‘springy” which accentuates the happy character of the Havanese. Tail is carried up over the back when gaiting. The breed is of solid physical type and sound constitution. The Havanese gives a rugged impression of a little dog, it is sturdy, and while a small breed, it is neither fragile nor overdone.

Temperament
Havanese are natural companion dogs: gentle and responsive. They become very attached to their human families and are excellent with children. Very affectionate and playful with a high degree of intelligence. These cheerful dogs are very sociable and will get along with everyone including people, dogs, cats and other pets. They are easy to obedience train and get along well with other dogs. This curious dog loves to observe what is going on. They are sensitive to the tone of one’s voice and will not listen if they sense that they are stronger minded than their owner, however they will also not respond well to harsh discipline. Owners need to be calm, yet possess an air of natural authority. The Havanese have a long reputation of being circus dogs, probably because it learns quickly and enjoys doing things for people. Few tend to bark a lot, as they can be taught not to do this. It is not their nature to bark a lot. It is best to teach them not to bark unnecessarily while they are still young to prevent it from becoming a habit. Havanese are good watch dogs – making sure to alert you when a visitor arrives, but will quickly welcome the guest once it sees you welcome them. Some dogs, who have not been properly socialized, may exhibit a degree of shyness around strangers, but this is not characteristic of the breed. Havanese live for your every word and gesture. They should be neither timid nor aggressive, for dogs who do, are a result of a human who is not providing proper pack leadership, and / or who are not treating the dog like a canine, but rather a human. It shows no cowardice, in spite of its size. Do not allow the Havanese to develop Small Dog Syndrome.

Height
8-11 inches (20-28 cm.)

Weight
7-13 pounds (3-6 kg.)

Health Problems
This is a very healthy long-lived breed, however, all long-lived breeds eventually have health problems. Some are prone to hip dysplasia, PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy), poodle eye, Juvenile heritable cataracts, luxating patellas, Chonrdodyplasia, Patellar Luxation (dislocated knee caps), Legg-Calve Perthes Disease, unilateral and bilateral deafness and dry skin.

Living Conditions
Havanese are good for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Havanese are born to live in your home, and not in a patio or a kennel. but at the same time, they require plenty of exercise.

Exercise
This playful little dog has an average demand for exercise. This breed needs to be taken on a daily walk. While walking be sure to make the dog heel on the lead. It is an instinct for a dog to migrate daily and to have a leader and in their mind the leader leads the way. This is very important to raising up a well rounded, balanced pet.

Life Expectancy
About 14-15 years

Grooming
For pets the coat can be clipped short for easier care. If the coat is to be kept long it needs to be thoroughly brushed and combed at least twice a week. There is a lotion available to prevent the hair from splitting. Clip excess hair from between the pads of the feet. The feet themselves may be clipped to look round. Show dogs need a great deal more grooming. There is little to no shedding, so dead hair must be removed by brushing. Check the eyes and ears regularly. If the ears are not kept clean it is prone to get an ear infection. The beauty of a well groomed Havanese is that he still looks tousled and carefree. If you accustom your dog to nail clipping from puppy age, she should accept the routine as an adult. Teeth should be brushed weekly, and is also best started as a puppy. This breed is good for allergy sufferers. They are a non-shedding- hypo allergenic dog. However, the Shavanese (Havanese born with a short coat) have coats more like the average dog, and comparable in looks to a Papillon. They do shed. It is believed, but not yet 100% confirmed, that unlike the long haired Havanese, the short haired Shavanese is not hypo allergenic and therefore not a good choice for allergy sufferers.

Origin
Following the French, Cuban and Russian revolutions, the Havanese were almost extinct. Now rare in Cuba, the breed has been facing a crises through the 1900’s, but is presently on the rise in popularity, having some dedicated believers in the breed who are actively campaigning for its preservation in the USA. This dog belongs to the family of Dogs called Bichons. The French word Bichon Frise means “fleecy dog” or “curly lap dog”. “Bichon”; refers to the bearded appearance of the breed, as the word “barbichon”; means little beard, the word “Frise” means curly. The Bichon Havanese originated in Cuba from an earlier breed known as Blanquito de la Habana (also called Havanese Silk Dog – a now extinct breed) The Bichon Havanese adorned and enlivened the homes of aristocratic Cubans during the 18th & 19th centuries. Bichon Lapdogs were being brought to Cuba in 17th century from Europe, they adapted to climate and customs of Cuba. Eventually, these conditions gave birth to a different dog, smaller than its predecessors, with a completely white coat of a silkier texture. This dog was the Blanquito de la Habana. In the 19th century, the Cubans took to liking the French and German Poodles, which were crossed with the existing Blanquito to create today’s Bichon Havanese. In the development of the Havanese, the Blanquito was much more dominant than the poodle. The Bichon Havanese originated in the 19th century (1800-1900). It was continually bred in Cuba all through the 20th century (1900-2000) and was the preferred pet/dog of the Cuban families. Breeding the Havanese in the USA only started in the 1970’s. In the 1960’s many Cubans migrated to USA. Most Cuban refugees settled in Florida, and some brought their pets (Havanese). A US breeder, Mrs. Goodale saved the breed from extinction. She advertised in the Florida paper, and found two or three immigrant families who had brought their Havanese from Cuba with papers. From them Mrs. Goodale got 6 Bichon Havanese with pedigrees; a bitch with 4 female pups, and a young unrelated male. Later she was able to get 5 more males from Costa Rica. As an experienced breeder, Mrs. Goodale began working with the 11 dogs. Her first lines appeared in 1974. The UKC recognized them in 1991. The AKC recognized them in 1996. The CKC (Canadian Kennel Club) recognized them in 2001. Around 1980, several German breeders started finding odd-coated puppies in litters with regular Havanese. As these pups matured they did not grow full coats like their other littermates. They had feathering on the skirts, tail, legs, chest, and ears – the rest of the body hair was close lying. They oddly enough grew up to have smooth coats. Breeders got together and found that this was happening in other litters of Havanese and was not a chance genetic mutation in one single litter, but something carried in a lot of Havanese as a recessive gene. These dogs were called Smooth-Coated Havanese, but have picked up the name Shavanese somewhere along the line. The short coated Havanese are not showable or breedable, however they are perfectly healthy.

Group
Toy

Recognition
CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, KCGB, NKC, CKC, ANKC, APRI, ACR, DRA only those Havanese registered with the Original Havanese Club (OHC) may be registered with the UKC. The Havanese is also recognized by the American Rare Breed Association.